Tag Archives: Pibil

Pibil Pork Tamales~Preparing a Chile Infused Masa

Pork Pibil Tamales with a Chile Infused Masa . Besides my Mom’s traditional chile colorado tamales and tamales de frijol, this recipe for Pibil Pork tamales is right up there in flavor and another of my favorites! I was asked by a friend if I could prepare some “not so spicy” pork tamales for her husband who is from Puerto Rico. Pork is used in many  delicious and popular Puerto Rican dishes, but chile peppers are not traditionally used . The pibil is infused with dried chile guajillos, wich are mostly on the milder side. The added citrus and spices in the pork add great traditional Mexican flavors and I wanted him to enjoy a more authentic flavored tamal. I say this often when blogging about tamales. It can seem a bit overwhelming, the whole process of making tamales at home takes time and planning. Take your time, step by step and break it up into a couple of days. Before you know it, you will be enjoying a plate of hot tamales from your own kitchen. Buen Provecho! 

Pibil Pork Tamales with a Chilie Colorado Infused Masa Garnished With a Roasted Salsa
Pibil Pork Tamales with a Chilie Colorado Infused Masa Garnished With a Roasted Salsa

For Masa

10 chile guajillo, stems and seeds removed

5 cups masa harina
3 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons chicken bouillon granules
1 teaspoon salt
3 1/2 cups warm low sodium chicken broth
1 1/2 cups pork lard, melted
1/2 cup warm chicken broth

Chile Colorado Infused Masa for Tamales
Chile Colorado Infused Masa for Tamales
Chile Colorado Infused Masa before adding the Manteca
Chile Colorado Infused Masa before adding the Manteca

 


You will also need
50 dried corn husk
*soak the corn husk in very hot water for at least one hour before using for tamales
6 cup Pork Pibil Filling * Click onto picture of “Shredded Pibil Pork”  for complete recipe 

Cochinita Pibil Style Shredded Pork
Cochinita Pibil Style Shredded Pork, click onto picture for complete pork recipe.

 

Directions

1. Transfer the chile guajillos to a sauce pan. Cover with water, bring to a boil, reduce heat and cook for 10 minutes. Let steep for 30 minutes. For Masa: Combine the masa harina, baking powder and salt, set aside. After 30 minutes, drain the chiles and transfer to the blender. Add 1 cup of fresh water, blend on high until smooth and strain pulp out with a wire mesh strainer.  Stir together the warm broth  with chile sauce. Gradually add the liquid to the dry ingredients until dough forms. Mix in the melted lard and remaining 1/2 cup of chicken broth. Taste masa for salt, cover and let set for 30 minutes.

2. Set up corn husk, masa and filling to assemble tamales. Shake off excess water from husk. You want the husk to be uniform in size, about 5 inches in diameter. Spread a generous amount of masa (1/4 cup) on bottom half of husk.  Leave a little space on each side of husk with no masa. Fill with 3 tablespoons of filling, fold in sides, then top down. Continue filling until done.

3. Prepare large steamer pot or tamalera. Fill bottom with water so it just comes up to the steamer insert. Arrange the tamales, open side up, in pot. Cover tamales with extra cork husk, layer them on top to cover or use foil paper. Bring to a rapid boil, reduce heat, and continue steaming for 1 1/2 hours. You will add hot water as needed. I set my timer for every 30 minutes and add more hot water.  Never let it run out of water. Remove from heat and let stand for 30 minutes before serving. They will firm up as they cool. Yields 40 to 43 large tamales .

4. Serve tamales with your favorite salsa verde or tomato salsa recipes. Cool the tamales completely before storing in an airtight container or plastic storage bag. If freezing, wrap or store in freezer bags, 6 per bag. Don’t forget to lable and date the bags.This will make it easier when it comes to defrosting. To reheat, add to a covered casserole dish and heat in microwave or in the oven. I like to reheat my defrosted tamales on a medium heat comal or griddle pan until the corn husk start to char slightly. There is nothing like that wonderful aroma to take me right back home and right into my Mom’s cocina.

Pork Pibil Tamales
Pork Pibil Tamales
Pork Pibil Tamales Ready to be Steamed
Pork Pibil Tamales Ready to be Steamed
Pibil Pork Tamales
Pibil Pork Tamales
My favorite way to enjoy tamales is the next day when I can reheat them on a hot comal.
My favorite way to enjoy tamales is the next day when I can reheat them on a hot comal.
Pork Pibil Tamales Reheated the Next Day with Garnishes
Pork Pibil Tamales Reheated the Next Day with Garnishes

Con Sabor a Cochinita Pibil ~Low and Slow Shredded Pork

Con Sabor a Cochinita Pibil~ Low and Slow Shredded Pork. Tamale making during the summer? I like living on the edge! Lol! I was asked to prepare some pork tamales this past summer by a friend. But instead of my family’s traditional chile rojo tamales, I decided to prepare another of my favorite pork recipes. Cochinita Pibil is traditionally prepared with a whole hog, in the ground covered in banana leaves and cooked for many, many hours. I like my recipes low and slow and traditional, but I will save that for when I can visit Mexico again, ha ha!  For this recipe, I took a little help from my slow cooker and then finished cooking the pork on the stove top. If I was serving this for tacos, I would have served it right out of the slow cooker. But this was going to be for my tamale filling and I needed to reduce the broth until the meat is extra tender and the sauce was thick. I will be adding the Pibil Pork Tamal Recipe to my blog today as well. It was too much to try at post it all in one blog…lol! Please enjoy!  #tamalesyearround

Start the marinated pork in the slow cooker and finish on the stove top. Cochinita Pibil Style Shredded Pork.
Start the marinated pork in the slow cooker and finish on the stove top. Cochinita Pibil Style Shredded Pork.

Marinade
1 1/2 cups sour orange (Badia brand)
* if not available, juice 5 oranges and 5 limes
1/3 cup olive oil
5 teaspoons annatto powder or paste
3 teaspoons granulated garlic
2 teaspoons granulated onion
2 teaspoons cumin
2 teaspoons pepper
2 teaspoons Mexican oregano
1 teaspoon coriander
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
Salt to taste
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground clove

Fresh ingedients combine with spices to create a savory pibil marinade.
Fresh ingedients combine with spices to create a savory pibil marinade.
A little help from the store with this Badia Brand Sour Orange Marinade
A little help from the store with this Badia Brand Sour Orange Marinade

 

You will also need
3 1/2 pounds pork shoulder/butt, sliced into 2 inch pieces

1 large white onion, peeled and sliced into thick rings

15 chile guajillo

Pibil marinade for pork butt/shoulder, best marinated overnight.
Pibil marinade for pork butt/shoulder, best marinated overnight.
For this recipe I used all chile guajillos, but I like to mix with chile ancho often when preparing sauces and adobo.
For this recipe I used all chile guajillos, but I like to mix with chile ancho often when preparing sauces and adobo.

 

Directions

1. Blend all of the ingredients for marinade. Marinate pork overnight. Remove stems and seeds from the guajillo peppers and transfer to pot. Cover with water, bring to a boil, reduce heat and cook for 15 minutes. Drain peppers and transfer to blender. Add 1 1/2 cups fresh water and blend on high until smooth. Strain through wire mesh strainer, Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

2. Add thick sliced onion to bottom of slow cooker. Add pork and all of the marinade. Cover tightly with foil paper then lid. Cook on high for 4 hours. Remove from slow cooker and shred pork, along with all of the onions. 

3. Skim off as much of the fat from broth left in slow cooker. Transfer all the pork and broth (about 4 cups) to a heavy pot. Heat to medium. Add reserved chile guajillo sauce. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and continue cooking for 1  to 1 1/2 hours or until most of the liquid has evaporated.  At this time, I like to reseason with a little more cumin, oregano, garlic and salt as it cooks down.

4. I prepared this pibil pork specifically for a tamal filling. This is the reason I cook it down to reduce the broth. It’s much easier to fill tamales with a more solid filling with less broth. All stove tops vary as far as exact cooking time. The idea is for the broth to reduce, but you can stop cooking  sooner if you like it with more broth. The pork is great for tacos, enchiladas, burritos and tostadas as well.  If using for tamales, it is good for about 40 large tamales. Yields about 6 cups.

Cochinita Pibil Style Shredded Pork
Cochinita Pibil Style Shredded Pork
Pibil Pork Tamales with a warm tomato/serrano salsa
Pibil Pork Tamales with a warm tomato/serrano salsa