Tag Archives: Pork Tamales

Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado (Chile Ancho Braised Pork Ribs)

One of my all time favorite recipes that reminds of Mom and home are Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado. These country style boneless ribs are seared and browned at high heat and then braised in a homemade chile ancho sauce for almost 3 hours. The results are a tender, moist and flavorful rib. I don’t think my Mom ever used the boneless version of the country style ribs, but I find them to be economical and you don’t have to worry about any small, sharp bones. My ispiration for wanting to cook these ribs, was that I wanted to prepare a special batch of pork tamales for my good friend Olivia. She used to help me prep for hours in the early mornings when I was cooking a Mexican lunch in one of the local towns. Prep work can be tedious and not everyone has the nack or the patience for it. I often say that it’s my “kitchen therapy”. I wanted to surprise her on our upcoming visit with these tamales. This was the fastest batch of tamales I ever prepared, LOL! Plus I was anxious to try out my new vintage steamer pot that I found for a good price at the antique center. It worked like a charm for a small batch of tamales.  And with the remaining part of the ribs, we enjoyed them with rice,  beans  and warm tortillas. The best!

**Don’t forget to check out my recipe for tamales at the end of this post using the delicious recipe for Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado!!

Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado

Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado

Ingredients

10 chile ancho, stems and seeds removed
2 cups chicken broth
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
4 cloves garlic
1/2 onion
2 teaspoons oregano
1 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon Maggi Sauce
salt to taste

Chile Ancho has to be one of my most favorite of the dried chile peppers.
Chile Ancho has to be one of my most favorite of the dried chile peppers.
Depending on how old the dried pepper are, your sauce can come out anywhere from bright red to a dark reddish brown color.
Depending on how old the dried pepper are, your sauce can come out anywhere from bright red to a dark reddish brown color.

 

You will also need
2 1/2 pounds boneless pork country style ribs
salt
pepper
garlic powder
2 more cups broth

*Grapeseed or canola oil

 

Investing in a few oven proof skillets and pans comes in handy when you have recipes that require you to brown and braise the meat.
Investing in a few oven proof skillets and pans comes in handy when you have recipes that require you to brown and braise the meat.

 

1. Cover the chile ancho with water. Bring to a boil , reduce the heat and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the liquid and transfer to the blender. To the chiles, add 2 cups broth, cumin seeds, garlic, onion, oregano, pepper, Maggi sauce, and salt to taste. Blend on high until smooth. Set aside.

2. Season the pork with salt, pepper and garlic powder on both sides. In a deep skillet, add 4 tablespoons of oil. Preheat to medium heat for 5 minutes. Add the pork to hot pan and brown on all sides, turning as needed.

3. Add the sauce from blender and 2 remaining cups of chicken broth to the ribs in pan. Stir to combine, reduce heat. Cover and cook on the stove top at a low simmer for 2 1/2 to 3 hours. You could also finish cooking it in a 350 degree oven for or in the slow cooker(on high) for about the same time. If the chile sauce gets too thick, add a little more water or broth as it cooks. Yields 4 to 6 servings.

 

This recipe was ans still is a favorite among all of my siblings. Most often, my mom prepared the recipe with bone in ribs.
This recipe was ans still is a favorite among all of my siblings. Most often, my mom prepared the recipe with bone in ribs.
Not only are these ribs great to serve as is, but I took about 1 pound of the ribs and chopped them up. The next day I prepared a small batch of tamales for a good friend.
Not only are these ribs great to serve as is, but I took about 1 pound of the ribs and chopped them up. The next day I prepared a small batch of tamales for a good friend.
Love that the pot is so light weight and did an excellent job on steaming the tamales!
Love that the pot is so light weight and did an excellent job on steaming the tamales!
Two cups of pork filling with about 2 full cups of prepared masa for tamales yields about 14 tamales.
Two cups of pork filling with about 2 full cups of prepared masa for tamales yields about 14 tamales.

Once you prepare you chile colorado sauce for the costillas de puerco from recipe above, reserve 1/2 cup of the sauce. This will be the sauce you add to the masa for tamales.

Chile Colorado Pork Tamales

Masa
4 cups masa harina
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup chile ancho sauce
3 1/2 cups warm chicken broth
1 cup pork manteca or shortening, melted

You Will Also Need

30 to 40 cornhusk for tamales

4 full cups of cooled pork filling, finely chopped

 

1. I would suggest you soak the cornhusk overnight in some really hot water. The next day, drain the water and cover with more hot water before using.


2. Mix the dry ingredients. Mix in the warm broth and chile sauce until dough forms. Gradually mix in the manteca or shortening until well incorporated. Taste for salt, cover and let set for 30 minutes.

3. Set up your assembly station with cornhusk, masa and filling. Take a cornhusk, shake off excess water and spread with masa on the bottom half, about 3 tablespoons of masa. Fill down the center with 2 tablespoons of pork filling. Fold in the sides to close, then fold down top flap. Place seam side down onto tray until you are done filling.

4. Fill the bottom of a steamer pot with water. Place the filled tamales, open side up, in a steamer pot. Bring to a quick boil on high heat, Lower the temperature to medium and steam for a good hour and 15 minutes. I like to set my timer for every 30 minutes and fill steamer with 2 more cups of hot water. You never want to run out of water when steaming the tamales. It’s best to have a little too much than run out.

5. When time is up, just shut off the heat and let tamales set up in the pot for 30 minutes or more. To test a tamal right away, pull one out and let it cool slightly. The husk should pull away from the tamal easily. The cooler they get the more firm they will become. This recipe yields 30 good size tamales. * I prepared only half of the tamales on this day and left the rest for another day. That’s why the steamer pot was not full.

Place filled tamales seam side down as you fill them.
Place filled tamales seam side down as you fill them.
Usually when I get to the last taml, there is an odd amount of masa left, so I just take it all and make one big tamal, lol!  They are known as el tamal borracho.
Usually when I get to the last taml, there is an odd amount of masa left, so I just take it all and make one big tamal, lol! They are known as el tamal borracho.
When I don't have enough tamales to fit the steamer pot, I will insert a heat safe bowl or small pot in the center. This will keep the tamales from falling  over and becoming mis-shapen while they steam.
When I don’t have enough tamales to fit the steamer pot, I will insert a heat safe bowl or small pot in the center. This will keep the tamales from falling over and becoming mis-shapen while they steam.
You know the tamal is tasty when it can stand on it's own without adding salsa. But again, the salsa verde is a must  and the way I remember enjoying them at home.
You know the tamal is tasty when it can stand on it’s own without adding salsa. But again, the salsa verde is a must and the way I remember enjoying them at home.