Tag Archives: Chile Ancho

Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado (Chile Ancho Braised Pork Ribs)

One of my all time favorite recipes that reminds of Mom and home are Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado. These country style boneless ribs are seared and browned at high heat and then braised in a homemade chile ancho sauce for almost 3 hours. The results are a tender, moist and flavorful rib. I don’t think my Mom ever used the boneless version of the country style ribs, but I find them to be economical and you don’t have to worry about any small, sharp bones. My ispiration for wanting to cook these ribs, was that I wanted to prepare a special batch of pork tamales for my good friend Olivia. She used to help me prep for hours in the early mornings when I was cooking a Mexican lunch in one of the local towns. Prep work can be tedious and not everyone has the nack or the patience for it. I often say that it’s my “kitchen therapy”. I wanted to surprise her on our upcoming visit with these tamales. This was the fastest batch of tamales I ever prepared, LOL! Plus I was anxious to try out my new vintage steamer pot that I found for a good price at the antique center. It worked like a charm for a small batch of tamales.  And with the remaining part of the ribs, we enjoyed them with rice,  beans  and warm tortillas. The best!

**Don’t forget to check out my recipe for tamales at the end of this post using the delicious recipe for Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado!!

Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado

Costillas de Puerco en Chile Colorado

Ingredients

10 chile ancho, stems and seeds removed
2 cups chicken broth
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
4 cloves garlic
1/2 onion
2 teaspoons oregano
1 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon Maggi Sauce
salt to taste

Chile Ancho has to be one of my most favorite of the dried chile peppers.
Chile Ancho has to be one of my most favorite of the dried chile peppers.
Depending on how old the dried pepper are, your sauce can come out anywhere from bright red to a dark reddish brown color.
Depending on how old the dried pepper are, your sauce can come out anywhere from bright red to a dark reddish brown color.

 

You will also need
2 1/2 pounds boneless pork country style ribs
salt
pepper
garlic powder
2 more cups broth

*Grapeseed or canola oil

 

Investing in a few oven proof skillets and pans comes in handy when you have recipes that require you to brown and braise the meat.
Investing in a few oven proof skillets and pans comes in handy when you have recipes that require you to brown and braise the meat.

 

1. Cover the chile ancho with water. Bring to a boil , reduce the heat and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the liquid and transfer to the blender. To the chiles, add 2 cups broth, cumin seeds, garlic, onion, oregano, pepper, Maggi sauce, and salt to taste. Blend on high until smooth. Set aside.

2. Season the pork with salt, pepper and garlic powder on both sides. In a deep skillet, add 4 tablespoons of oil. Preheat to medium heat for 5 minutes. Add the pork to hot pan and brown on all sides, turning as needed.

3. Add the sauce from blender and 2 remaining cups of chicken broth to the ribs in pan. Stir to combine, reduce heat. Cover and cook on the stove top at a low simmer for 2 1/2 to 3 hours. You could also finish cooking it in a 350 degree oven for or in the slow cooker(on high) for about the same time. If the chile sauce gets too thick, add a little more water or broth as it cooks. Yields 4 to 6 servings.

 

This recipe was ans still is a favorite among all of my siblings. Most often, my mom prepared the recipe with bone in ribs.
This recipe was ans still is a favorite among all of my siblings. Most often, my mom prepared the recipe with bone in ribs.
Not only are these ribs great to serve as is, but I took about 1 pound of the ribs and chopped them up. The next day I prepared a small batch of tamales for a good friend.
Not only are these ribs great to serve as is, but I took about 1 pound of the ribs and chopped them up. The next day I prepared a small batch of tamales for a good friend.
Love that the pot is so light weight and did an excellent job on steaming the tamales!
Love that the pot is so light weight and did an excellent job on steaming the tamales!
Two cups of pork filling with about 2 full cups of prepared masa for tamales yields about 14 tamales.
Two cups of pork filling with about 2 full cups of prepared masa for tamales yields about 14 tamales.

Once you prepare you chile colorado sauce for the costillas de puerco from recipe above, reserve 1/2 cup of the sauce. This will be the sauce you add to the masa for tamales.

Chile Colorado Pork Tamales

Masa
4 cups masa harina
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup chile ancho sauce
3 1/2 cups warm chicken broth
1 cup pork manteca or shortening, melted

You Will Also Need

30 to 40 cornhusk for tamales

4 full cups of cooled pork filling, finely chopped

 

1. I would suggest you soak the cornhusk overnight in some really hot water. The next day, drain the water and cover with more hot water before using.


2. Mix the dry ingredients. Mix in the warm broth and chile sauce until dough forms. Gradually mix in the manteca or shortening until well incorporated. Taste for salt, cover and let set for 30 minutes.

3. Set up your assembly station with cornhusk, masa and filling. Take a cornhusk, shake off excess water and spread with masa on the bottom half, about 3 tablespoons of masa. Fill down the center with 2 tablespoons of pork filling. Fold in the sides to close, then fold down top flap. Place seam side down onto tray until you are done filling.

4. Fill the bottom of a steamer pot with water. Place the filled tamales, open side up, in a steamer pot. Bring to a quick boil on high heat, Lower the temperature to medium and steam for a good hour and 15 minutes. I like to set my timer for every 30 minutes and fill steamer with 2 more cups of hot water. You never want to run out of water when steaming the tamales. It’s best to have a little too much than run out.

5. When time is up, just shut off the heat and let tamales set up in the pot for 30 minutes or more. To test a tamal right away, pull one out and let it cool slightly. The husk should pull away from the tamal easily. The cooler they get the more firm they will become. This recipe yields 30 good size tamales. * I prepared only half of the tamales on this day and left the rest for another day. That’s why the steamer pot was not full.

Place filled tamales seam side down as you fill them.
Place filled tamales seam side down as you fill them.
Usually when I get to the last taml, there is an odd amount of masa left, so I just take it all and make one big tamal, lol!  They are known as el tamal borracho.
Usually when I get to the last taml, there is an odd amount of masa left, so I just take it all and make one big tamal, lol! They are known as el tamal borracho.
When I don't have enough tamales to fit the steamer pot, I will insert a heat safe bowl or small pot in the center. This will keep the tamales from falling  over and becoming mis-shapen while they steam.
When I don’t have enough tamales to fit the steamer pot, I will insert a heat safe bowl or small pot in the center. This will keep the tamales from falling over and becoming mis-shapen while they steam.
You know the tamal is tasty when it can stand on it's own without adding salsa. But again, the salsa verde is a must  and the way I remember enjoying them at home.
You know the tamal is tasty when it can stand on it’s own without adding salsa. But again, the salsa verde is a must and the way I remember enjoying them at home.

 

 

Chile Ancho Marinated Filet of Beef

One of the most used dried peppers in my kitchen is chile ancho. Chile ancho  are the dried version of those big, green, beautiful poblano peppers. I love both equally and it would be hard for me to choose which is my favorite. I was spoiled for a few years when one of the local markets was carrying big bags of chile ancho. I was well stocked and could prepare a batch of pork tamales on the spot! Lol! Ok, maybe in two days… if I had the pork already. Fortunate for me I have friends who live all over the United States and local friends who travel all over as well. On several occasions I have traded product with foodie friends who live in other states. I send them hard to find items that they cannot purchase in their area and they do the same for me.  And for the friends that live locally, I cook some special Mexican recipes that are not available in our area, such as Mom’s Pork Tamales, yeah baby! Ha, Ha, Ha! Everybody’s happy! For this recipe today, I am using this wonderful filet of beef that comes two in a package. This particular one is infused with “steak house flavors”, whatever that means, lol! Taste like it was brined in a salt/water solution is all. But, it does taste delicious. Chile ancho marinades or sauces pair well with any meat, especially pork and beef. This recipe takes longer to marinate than it does to actually cook it. We enjoyed the beef hot the first two nights, then had the best roast beef sandwiches for the next couple of days. It’s a great choice for entertaining as well. Serve it sliced as an appetizer with garlic crostini slices and some fresh pico de gallo or guacamole on top for your next dinner party.  

Chile Ancho Marinated Filet of Beef, Medium/Rare
Chile Ancho Marinated Filet of Beef, Medium/Rare
Chile Ancho Marinated Filet of Beef
Chile Ancho Marinated Filet of Beef before marinating overnight
Filet of Beef after 10 minutes of resting. Was dark out, so picture was dark as well. The next day, sliced thin. we had the best roast beef sandwiches!!
Filet of Beef after 10 minutes of resting. Was dark out, so picture was dark as well. The next day, sliced thin. we had the best roast beef sandwiches!!

Ingredients

8 to 10 chile ancho, stems and seeds removed and torn into smaller pieces
3 chile de arbol or 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
6 cloves garlic

Olive oil
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon oregano
1 teaspoon marjoram
2 cups chicken broth
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
Salt to taste
Fresh cracked pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
2 filet of beef, 1 pound each more or less
1 to 2 tablespoons of grapeseed or canola oil works best for high temperature searing

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Directions

1. Heat 1/3 olive oil to medium/low heat in a skillet. Add the torn pieces of chile ancho, chile de arbol and cloves of garlic. Cook in the oil for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring frequently so that peppers don’t overcook or burn. You want then to become aromatic and slightly soft. The garlic should be golden.

2. Add the cumin seeds, oregano and marjoram to the chiles and oil and cook for another 2 minutes. Add the broth, bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool.

3. Once cooled transfer all of the mixture to the blender. Add the vinegar, salt, pepper and Worcestershire sauce. Blend on high until smooth, set aside. Taste for salt. Transfer the beef filets to a heavy storage bag and pour in half of the chile ancho sauce. Reserve the other half. Marinate overnight.

4. Remove beef from refrigerator and from marinade 40 minutes before cooking it. When ready, preheat 2 tablespoons of grapeseed or canola oil in a cast iron pan to medium heat for 5 minutes. Also preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.

5. Sear the beef for 3 minutes on all sides, making sure you turn them right side up before they go in the oven.  Also before going into the oven baste the remaining chile ancho sauce over beef. Finish cooking in oven for 15 to 22 minutes or until internal temperature reads 130 to 135 degrees for medium rare or 140 for medium. Remove from oven and tent with foil paper for 10 minutes before slicing.  Serve with sauce from pan. Yields 8 servings.

Chile Ancho Marinated Filet of Beef
Chile Ancho Marinated Filet of Beef
If I had to suggest one thing, it would be to prepare some extra chile ancho sauce
If I had to suggest one thing, it would be to prepare some extra chile ancho sauce

Frijoles~ Beans~Legume – In My Kitchen

One of my jobs as a kid, was to help my Mom in the kitchen. The jobs were pretty easy, chopping mostly. My favorite job was when I was asked to help clean the dried pinto beans. Many times purchased in bulk, 5 pounds at a time, they contains broken beans and small stones. I remember sitting across the kitchen table from my Mom and we would spread the beans out onto the table in between us. In no time those beans we free and clear of all stones and broken beans. I could still hear the sound of the beans as we pushed them into that large, empty stainless steel pot. This one pot of beans would take us through many meals. On this blog post, I share with you a few of my favorite recipes prepared with homemade  beans.    

 

Frijoles de Olla

 

Frijoles de Olla
Frijoles de Olla



3 cups of dry pinto beans
1 medium white onion, quartered
1 whole bulb garlic
2 bay leaves
1 serrano or jalapeño
2 chile de arbol
salt to taste

1. Soak the beans overnight.
2. Drain and rinse the next day.
3. Cover with water, 3 inches above beans.
4. Add aromatics
5. Bring to a simmer.Partially covered, keep at a simmer for 2 to 2 1/2 hours or until beans become tender. You will have to add hot water twice so the water level stays up. Add salt to taste once beans are tender. Remove aromatics. Yields about 8 cups.

Tips~ Remove aromatics and cool completely before storing in an airtight container. They will keep in the refrigerator for a week or divide into 2 cup portions with enough broth to cover and freeze in airtight containers or quart size freezer bags.

My favorite way to enjoy Frijoles de Olla is in their own broth with diced onion, chile, cilantro and lemon
My favorite way to enjoy Frijoles de Olla is in their own broth with diced onion, chile, cilantro and lemon

 

Frijoles con Chorizo

Frijoles con Chorizo
Frijoles con Chorizo

 

1 tablespoon of pork manteca or oil of your choice
1 cup uncooked mexican chorizo (I used homemade chorizo which has less fat, so I added some for cooking). Search under chorizo in categories for homemade chorizo recipes
1/3 cup white onion, diced
1 serrano, minced
3 cups whole pinto beans in their broth (about 1 cup)
Pinch of cumin, optional

*Crumbled Queso Fresco for garnish

1. In a large skillet, heat manteca to medium heat. Add the chorizo and cook for 6 to 8 minutes.

2, Add the onions and chile and cook for another 4 minutes. Add the beans and broth. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer.

3. After they simmer for about 5 minutes, mash with a potato masher until desired consistency. If the beans become too dry, add a little more broth or water. Bring on the homemade flour tortillas and avocado! Yields 6 servings.

Tips~ For a smoother bean, you could blend the beans in their brother on high before adding them to the cooked chorizo/onion mixture.

Frijoles con Chorizo

My favorite meal as a kid and still my favorite meal as an adult.
My favorite meal as a kid and still my favorite meal as an adult.

 

Frijoles Borrachos, Charros, A la Charra (aka Drunken Beans) …..Just serve me a bowl already! LOL!

Frijoles Borrachos, Charros, A la Charra
Frijoles Borrachos, Charros, A la Charra

4 cups cooked pinto beans 
1 cup broth from beans
7 strips of bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 serrano chile, sliced into thick rings or minced
1 small white onion, diced
Handful of chopped cilantro
12 oz of a light beer
salt and pepper
Oil, manteca, canola or olive oil

Directions:


1. In a large pot, heat 1 tablespoon of oil of your choice. Add the bacon and cook until browned. Add the onions, chile serrano and cilantro, stir well to combine.

2. Add the beans, liquid from the beans and the beer. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer. Season with salt and  pepper to taste, stir, cover and cook for a good 20 to 25 minutes. Taste for salt.

Tips~ If you wanted to prepare these without beer, I like to replace the beer with low sodium chicken or beef broth. Garnish with lime wedges, cilantro, crema (Mexican cream) and warm tortillas or tostadas. These beans were always made with carne asada…

Beer, going in!!
Beer, going in!!

 

Kicked Up Smoked Ham and Beans

 

Kicked Up Smoked Ham and Beans
Kicked Up Smoked Ham and Beans


2 cups dried pinto beans(soaked overnight), washed and drained
1 cup diced onion
2 serranos, minced
3 chile de arbol
4 cloves garlic, smashed
Smoked ham bone
2 cups diced smoked ham
3 roma tomatoes, diced
1/3 cup cilantro, chopped
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
Juice of 1 lemon
salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. Add the first 6 ingredients to a large dutch oven pot and cover with water 3 to 4 inches above the beans. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and continue cooking for 2 hours or until beans become tender.

2. Once beans are tender, add all the remaining ingredients. Season to taste with salt and pepper and cook for another 25 minutes. Yields up to 8 servings.

 

 Frijoles Refritos con Chile Colorado

Frijoles Refritos con Chile Colorado
Frijoles Refritos con Chile Colorado


3 cups pinto beans (cooked) with their broth
5 to 6 chile ancho, stems and seeds removed
2 cloves garlic, sliced
1 teaspoon  cumin
1 teaspoon oregano
Salt to taste
1 cup chicken broth or more bean broth
2 tablespoons pork manteca (lard) or oil of your choice 


1. Transfer the chile ancho to a glass bowl. Cover with water and cook in the microwave for 7 to 9 minutes, turning halfway through cooking time. Remove from microwave and let cool slightly.

2. While the chiles are cooling, in a large nonstick skillet, heat 2 tablespoon of manteca (lard) or oil to medium heat. Add the beans and bring to a simmer. Drain the chile anchos and transfer to the blender. Add the cumin, oregano, garlic, salt to taste, and ½ cup water or chicken broth. Blend on high until smooth, set aside.

3. Add the chile ancho sauce to the beans, stir well to combine. When it comes to a boil, add the other ½ cup or more of chicken  or bean broth and reduce heat to a low simmer, stirring often. Taste for salt and while the beans are simmering, mash with a potato masher until desired texture. Cook until liquid is reduced by half.

Frijoles con Chile Colorado